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FAQ

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#Double_conversion or Online technology continually converts incoming AC power into filtered DC power and then re-converts it back into AC power with a pure sine wave. Constant online operation completely isolates sensitive equipment from every power problem on the AC line, with the reliable power protection of a traditional UPS.

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Our difference is the focus and our only business is power protection. We offer the "Best Value" for your power protection needs. With the widest in the stock ready selection of World-Class UPS's at low competitive prices. We can meet your most demanding power protection requirements while delivering market-leading UPS products priced for today's budget.

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Printers draw a very large amount of power when in use and it is not advised that they are provided with UPS backup power because it is not economical. Many UPS's for desktop use surge protected only outlets that do not provide backup power. This surge only ports are where laser printers should be plugged in since laser printers are plugged into outlets that do not use the UPS battery. If this surge only ports are not available on your UPS, consider using a power strip for the printer, directly plugged to a wall outlet.

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You can use our UPS Sizing Calculator for Cisco Equipment to have one of our specialists help you choose the best UPS for your situation.

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UPS batteries are typically rated for 3-5 years or 200 complete full-load discharge cycles assuming that the batteries have been maintained within manufacturer specifications. We recommend that UPS batteries be replaced every 2 to 3 years to ensure maximum performance in the time of need.

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Introduction: This note helps explain the differences between Watts and VA and explains how the terms are correctly and incorrectly used in specifying power protection equipment. Many people are confused about the distinction between the Watt and Volt-Amp (V-A) measures for UPS load sizing.

Background: The power drawn by computing equipment is expressed in Watts or Volt-Amps (VA). The power in Watts is the real power drawn by the equipment. Volt-Amps is called the "apparent power" and is the product of the voltage applied to the equipment times the current drawn by the equipment.

Both Watt and VA ratings have a use and purpose. The Watt rating determines the actual power purchased from the utility company and the heat loading generated by the equipment. The VA rating is used for sizing wiring and circuit breakers.

The VA and Watt ratings for some types of electrical loads, like incandescent light bulbs, are identical. However, for computer equipment, the Watt and VA ratings can differ significantly, with the VA rating always being equal to or larger than the Watt rating. The ratio of the Watt to VA rating is called the "Power Factor" and is expressed either as a number (i.e. 0.7) or a percentage (i.e. 70%).

The power rating of the UPS: UPS have both Watt ratings and VA ratings. Neither the Watt nor the VA rating of a UPS may be exceeded. In most cases, UPS manufacturers only publish the VA rating of the UPS. However, it is a standard in the industry that the Watt rating is approximately 60% of the VA rating, this being the typical power factor of common loads. Therefore, it is safe to assume that the Watt rating of the UPS is 60% of the published VA rating.

How to avoid sizing errors: Equipment nameplate ratings are often in VA, which makes it difficult to know the Watt ratings. If using equipment nameplate ratings for sizing, a user might configure a system which appears to be correctly sized based on VA ratings but actually exceeds the UPS Watt rating.

By sizing the VA rating of a load to be no greater than 60% of the VA rating of the UPS, it is impossible to exceed the Watt rating of the UPS. Therefore, unless you have a high certainty of the Watt ratings of the loads, the safest approach is to keep the sum of the load nameplate ratings below 60% of the UPS VA rating. Note that this conservative sizing approach will typically give rise to an oversized UPS and larger run time than expected. If optimization of the system and accurate run time are required, discuss your requirements with RefurbUPS Power protection representative, for product recommendations to meet your needs.

Conclusion: Power consumption information on computer loads is often not specified in a way that allows simple sizing of a UPS. It is possible to configure systems that appear to be correctly sized but actually overload the UPS. By slightly oversizing the UPS compared with the nameplate ratings of the equipment, proper operation of the system is ensured. Oversizing also provides the side benefit of providing additional UPS backup time.

By sizing the VA rating of a load to be no greater than 60% of the VA rating of the UPS, it is impossible to exceed the Watt rating of the UPS. Therefore, unless you have a high certainty of the Watt ratings of the loads, the safest approach is to keep the sum of the load nameplate ratings below 60% of the UPS VA rating. Note that this conservative sizing approach will typically give rise to an oversized UPS and larger run time than expected. If optimization of the system and accurate run time are required, discuss your requirements with RefurbUPS Power protection representative, for product recommendations to meet your needs.

Conclusion: Power consumption information on computer loads is often not specified in a way that allows simple sizing of a UPS. It is possible to configure systems that appear to be correctly sized but actually overload the UPS. By slightly oversizing the UPS compared with the nameplate ratings of the equipment, proper operation of the system is ensured. Oversizing also provides the side benefit of providing additional UPS backup time.

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